Tags: buckminsterfullerene

Happy In(ter)dependence Day!

by Ruth Tenzer Feldman
Published on: July 4, 2013
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buckminsterfullerene

Let’s start with the science part. You are looking at a drawing of a fullerene, which is any molecule made out of carbon. Think diamonds. This fullerene is Carbon-60, and it’s called a buckminsterfullerene (“bucky ball”), named for Richard Buckminster Fuller, known for his geodesic domes. Look familiar? Think soccer ball. We’ll add some science at the end of the post, too.

A bucky ball reminds me of the value of both interdependence and independence. The two states complement each other. I’ll spare you paragraphs of my philosophy on the in(ter)dependence of every entity (sentient or otherwise) on the planet, and get to three main points.

1. Writing.  In(ter)dependence recognizes that what we authors strive for is a story  (fiction or “faction”) in which all elements work as a cohesive unit. Yes, inspiration plays a part. But much of writing is about finding a balanced interdependence that creates something with integrity, structurally solid and highly satisfying. Character, pacing, sensory description, point of view—you name it—all in supportive equipoise. You get the picture. Sabina’s latest post has more to say on the matter.

2. Critique groups. In(ter)dependence recognizes that each member of a group like Viva Scriva brings to every meeting or every manuscript a unique independent perspective that benefits the group as a whole. Conversely, each member of the group can strengthen her own voice through the critiques and support she receives by being linked to the group. You can call it the bucky ball approach to writers’ critique groups. We call it the Viva Scriva mojo.

3. Publishing world. In(ter)dependence recognizes that at one point you decided not to hide your writing under the unpaid bills envelope. You took the brave step to bring your piece to readers you don’t know. You, the independent you with your unique muse, are linked to agents, editors, publishers, publicists, librarians, teachers, readers, and other authors. Since you are reading this post, you know what I mean. Sometimes things don’t go well. Doh! But sometimes you can fly.

So here’s to the beautiful part of in(ter)dependence. Buckminsterfullerenes are soluable. When they are dissolved in olive oil, they turn a glorious pearly, luminescent purple. What a wonderous world.  Happy In(ter)dependence Day. Write on!

Carbon_60_Olive_Oil_Solution

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