Facing our Fears

by Sabina I. Rascol
Published on: September 1, 2013
Categories: Challenges, Inspiration
Comments: No Comments

Twyla TharpI loved Twyla Tharp’s The Creative Habit when I read it months ago. I thought it was an essential inspirational book and workbook for any creative type, and wanted to return to it. I just did.

 

On pages 22-23, Tharp (left) exorcises her fears by naming* and looking at them, one by one. I decided to do the same. My own fears have held steady over the last few months:

 

-My book(s) will not be as good on the page as they are in my head.

-I am still not 1000% sure which pathway is best through the options of my story.

-My book(s) may not affect readers as intensely as some books affect me.

-My family may not be happy with what I did in books that are inspired by, or based on, family stories.

-It will take far longer to write my book(s) than I think it will, or than I think it SHOULD.

 

Examining my own fears:

 

My book(s) will not be as good on the page as they are in my head.

No, they may not be, and that’s a universal fear and reality. But I believe I can write, and I am willing to do the refining and polishing work to get my books as close as I can to my vision. And—in some ways, what I write will be BETTER than what is in my head. If you craft stories, you too know how happy ideas crop up WHILE writing, connections and twists that you hadn’t thought of before sitting down to set down, or flesh out, what you’ve been imagining. [* Hmm! I hadn’t thought of this before.]

 

I am still not 1000% sure which pathway is best through the options of my story.

Yet the more work I do on my book, the closer I am getting to the specific variant of my complex story that I want to tell. Scriva encouragements/exercises from a couple of months ago help. For example: Write down the scenes and components you absolutely MUST have in.  THEN figure out how to connect them, or the order they should be in.

 

My book(s) may not affect readers as intensely as some authors’ books have affected me.

Some works make me ache with their depth, craft, and beauty. Each writer’s gift is different, and I already know that my books will not be Shakespeare or the Bible. Yet I have rich tales to tell; ability; the readiness to do the work; the sense, honed through much reading, of what pierces deeply and what stays on the surface, or, worse, annoys. And I have the Scrivas, who will set me straight when I fall off the path or where I have blinders on.

 

My family may think I should have written differently the books that are inspired by, or based on, family stories.

That may be the case. So that I can write the books I want to, I’m holding myself separate from comments, negative OR positive, by keeping mum around family members about said projects as much as possible.

 

(In some way this last fear amuses me, and I think I shouldn’t have it, but I do.) It will take far longer to write my book(s) than I think it will, or than I think it SHOULD.

Yes, it will. Just get over it. And start now. Keep starting, as Neil Fiore, author of The Now Habit, says. Then one day, eventually, I WILL be done.

 

So what are your fears? What does examining them show you? What ends up being surprisingly helpful?

 

*

If you’re wondering, Tharp’s fears are:

 

1. People will laugh at me.

2. Someone has done it before.

3. I have nothing to say.

4. I will upset someone I love.

5. Once executed, the idea will never be as good as it is in my mind.

 

Sabina I. Rascol

www.sabinairascol.com

 

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